Gin Fizz with Garden Herbs

This cocktail is light and fresh, and since it’s officially spring herb season feel free to sub the rosemary for your favorite or what you have in your garden!

Ingredients (serves two):

  • 2 oz gin
  • 1/4 cup Sauvignon Blanc
  • 1/4 cup fresh berries (raspberries or cranberries work well)
  • 2 oz lime juice
  • Two tablespoons raw honey
  • About six or seven mint leaves
  • A rough tablespoon of rosemary
  • Two sprigs of rosemary for garnish
  • Ice for the shaker
  • Topo Chico
  • Two small coupe glasses or some mismatched glassware like these.

Muddle the berries and herbs until the berries mush and you can smell them mixing with the rosemary and mint. Add the honey and muddle to mix. Add the gin, wine and lime juice and shake vigorously.

Pour equal amounts in to the glasses (they will be about half full). Top off with Topo Chico and add rosemary for garnish.

Top 5 Veggies to Plant Now for an Early Urban Farm Harvest

Gardening is my second favorite activity (to cooking). There is nothing like deciding what to have for dinner and heading into my front yard to pluck the ingredients. My kids like to join in too — they love to try each kind of lettuce and then spit it out and tell me it’s gross (joke’s on them- they’re trying it!). They especially adore pulling carrots they’ve planted and helping me pick green beans, cherry tomatoes or blackberries. Below I’ve outlined the things you can plant right now, in March, for an early harvest. I like to plant about half of what I want now and save the rest for later in the month so my harvest is stretched out a bit longer. If you need seeds, click here to try out Seeds Now. This is an affiliate link, which means I make a small commission on a sale at no extra cost to you.

  1. Herbs. In my garden, herbs perform better than anything. I plant everything I can get my hands on that will fit in my small space — cilantro, oregano, basil, lavender, dill, and more. And you bet I use them every day, like in this gin and rosemary cocktail.

2. Root veggies, like carrots and radishes. These are a real crowd pleaser if you have kids who like to help in the garden. There is something so satisfying about watching them pull up veggies that they planted and will actually eat! You must till your soil deeply for success and sow them very shallow, not more than 1/4 of an inch.

3. Beans and peas: These are so easy they are the go-to for kindergarten teachers to have classrooms full of 5-year-olds plant in cups with wet paper towels. Seriously, if you have a little bit of decent soil, a trellis of some sort, sunlight and water, you will be kept in fresh beans/peas/snap peas — whatever your preference — all spring and sometimes into the fall if your summers are mild. Plant more than one variety for the best crop, and be sure to harvest these as they become ripe to allow the plants to produce as many as possible.

4. Lettuces, chards, kales, cabbages and other greens tend to do well in cooler early spring weather, and may even survive one last frost. I’ve already done spinach and several lettuces and will get cabbage and chard in the ground towards the end of March. And you’ll have plenty for this classic Italian soup.

5. Potatoes: These are another fun one because they are deceptively easy. I do mine in a grow bag, which eliminates the need for laborious digging to harvest. I saved a potato from a bag of organic gold potatoes last spring and let it sprout on my windowsill (place the potato in a cup of water halfway up the side of the potato, using toothpicks to keep it above the water line). Once it sprouted, I was able to cut it into slips and plant them in a grow bag. We had tiny, fresh, yummy gold potatoes for weeks. Roast them in duck fat like I do here.

I know this varies a bit based on what zone you are in, but most of these are fairly common to North America for this time of year (especially if you have cold frames or a greenhouse for your seedlings). Here are a couple of links to help you determine what’s right for your garden and your area. I also love Brooklyn Farm and Garden Betty for inspiration and tips!

Happy digging!

Sweet potato side dish with spring herbs and garlic

This sweet potato dish goes perfectly with a roast chicken, but would also be great for breakfast with an egg. It’s versatile and easy and if you prefer your sweet potatoes savory can make an excellent holiday dish too. Now that it’s gardening season, herbs are readily available so experiment with all kinds! (If you need some seeds, click here for my Seeds Now affiliate link.)

Ingredients (makes about four large servings):

  • 3 medium to large sweet potatoes
  • Four tablespoons avocado oil or duck fat
  • About a half a cup finely chopped herbs, your preference. I used sage, parsley, marjoram and oregano.
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic or a tablespoon of garlic paste

Instructions:

Peel and chop the sweet potatoes into bite sized cubes. Add the oil, garlic, herbs and spices and mix well. Prepare a baking dish with parchment paper if cooking these by themselves. Place them into the oven, preheated to 400, for about 20-30 minutes, depending on how soft you like them. I added these to a chicken I had roasting for the last 30 minutes.

Top 5 Edible Crops to Plant Now for an Early Urban Farm Harvest

Gardening is my second favorite activity (to cooking). There is nothing like deciding what to have for dinner and heading into my front yard to pluck the ingredients. My kids like to join in too — they love to try each kind of lettuce and then spit it out and tell me it’s gross (joke’s on them- they’re trying it!). They especially adore pulling carrots they’ve planted and helping me pick green beans, cherry tomatoes or blackberries. Below I’ve outlined the things you can plant right now, in March, for an early harvest. I like to plant about half of what I want now and save the rest for later in the month so my harvest is stretched out a bit longer. If you need seeds, click here to try out Seeds Now. This is an affiliate link, which means I make a small commission on a sale at no extra cost to you.

  1. Herbs. In my garden, herbs perform better than anything. I plant everything I can get my hands on that will fit in my small space — cilantro, oregano, basil, lavender, dill, and more. And you bet I use them every day, like in this gin and rosemary cocktail.

2. Root veggies, like carrots and radishes. These are a real crowd pleaser if you have kids who like to help in the garden. There is something so satisfying about watching them pull up veggies that they planted and will actually eat! You must till your soil deeply for success and sow them very shallow, not more than 1/4 of an inch.

3. Beans and peas: These are so easy they are the go-to for kindergarten teachers to have classrooms full of 5-year-olds plant in cups with wet paper towels. Seriously, if you have a little bit of decent soil, a trellis of some sort, sunlight and water, you will be kept in fresh beans/peas/snap peas — whatever your preference — all spring and sometimes into the fall if your summers are mild. Plant more than one variety for the best crop, and be sure to harvest these as they become ripe to allow the plants to produce as many as possible.

4. Lettuces, chards, kales, cabbages and other greens tend to do well in cooler early spring weather, and may even survive one last frost. I’ve already done spinach and several lettuces and will get cabbage and chard in the ground towards the end of March. And you’ll have plenty for this classic Italian soup.

5. Potatoes: These are another fun one because they are deceptively easy. I do mine in a grow bag, which eliminates the need for laborious digging to harvest. I saved a potato from a bag of organic gold potatoes last spring and let it sprout on my windowsill (place the potato in a cup of water halfway up the side of the potato, using toothpicks to keep it above the water line). Once it sprouted, I was able to cut it into slips and plant them in a grow bag. We had tiny, fresh, yummy gold potatoes for weeks. Roast them in duck fat like I do here.

I know this varies a bit based on what zone you are in, but most of these are fairly common to North America for this time of year (especially if you have cold frames or a greenhouse for your seedlings). Here are a couple of links to help you determine what’s right for your garden and your area. I also love Brooklyn Farm and Garden Betty for inspiration and tips!

Happy digging!